Always Read the Instructions… in Advance

IMG_0888Well what would you do? The only problem is the proper way of frying up these vegetables involves letting them sit for up to 4 hours! You see, the breading is meant to be just flour, salt and pepper, it becomes a batter after sitting long enough to draw the liquid out of the vegetables.  Of course, having not read the recipe in advance I was unaware of the length of preparation required, some of the simplest things, don’t come so simply! Not wanting to eat a 1AM I asked myself, “what would Tsipras do?” He would fight back against the austerity of short prep-time! So I made a batter by mixing water, pancake mix, and pepper. It coated the sliced veggies pretty nicely, threw them in the hot oil and out came delicious fried vegetables! I started by slicing the zucchini and salting it on both sides to draw out the moisture, while they sat, I fried up the eggplant. Next dried off the zucchinis, battered and fried.  I don’t recommend this brand of Tatziki, actually I recommend making it yourself, but who has the time? I think they forgot to put the garlic in.

IMG_0889Next time I might take more pictures.
Happy frying!

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Fried Supper!

Wholy smoking canola oil!!! It’s not even been a week and already more fried food? It would seem that when a pregnant wife (or any wife for that matter, but I’ve only got one of the pregnant variety) says, “I want fried perogies” and you say “in the deep frier?” The answer is a sort of, “what else would be a fried perogy?

Frankly it’s not enough to have fried perogies, I wanted to add a special treat, so we’ll start with that.

Dry off some of your favorite pickles, these are Mrs. White’s which are very salty.

Salty Pickles
Salty Pickles

Slice em!

But don't dice them.
But don’t dice them.

Mix some flour and spices, how about some herbs, some pepper, salt (but aren’t the pickles salty enough?), oh and some bread crumbs to give a little bit more crunch! (I cannot guarantee that this even works).

All that stuffed I mentioned.
All that stuff I mentioned.

Add some water to make a smooth batter, and drop in a pickle.

Sploosh!
Sploosh!

Pull it out, and repeat.

One, two....
One, two….

When they’re all battered up like so.

Just lazing around.
Just lazing around.

It’s time for a bath in the jacuzzi!! (Um 175/350 degrees? So far I always put the frier on max.)

Bubbles!
Bubble bath!

Let those cook for awhile. Meanwhile (or preceedinglywhile), since there is a certain amount of ethnic pride in the family, have Katie boil the perogies and dry them off.

They came from a bag in the frozen food department.
They came from a bag in the frozen food department.

Drain the pickles.

Mmmmmmm.
Mmmmmmm.

And prepare them in a pretty way for serving.

Beautiful!
I just plopped them down in a bowl, form from function right?

Now toss some perogies in the fryer.

If we keep this up, we're going to nee a bigger fryer!
If we keep this up, we’re going to need a bigger fryer!

And take those out when they’re done. It takes a few minutes.

Like little golden foods.
Like little golden foods.

Make a nice spread. Get some salad and sour creme, a glass of Porter, and you can eat!

Supper time!
Supper time!

So there we go, one super fried meal!

What’s a Cronut?

Everyone’s heard of Cronuts, but have they eaten them? Well I have, and haven’t! Time to change the latter… but not today. Why not? Because a Cronut is a puff pastry dough made with yeast, formed into donuts and fried. Frankly I’m not feeling that productive. So instead, faux-cronuts. I was lazy enough to buy a box of frozen pre-made puff pastry dough, which I rolled out a little and sliced.

Rolled and sliced!
Rolled and sliced!

Next I made them into donut-ish thingies:

Donut like thingies.
Donut like thingies.

Times… a bunch:

A baker's dozen!
A baker’s dozen!

And fry!

Frying
Frying!

Meanwhile a nice little chocolate glaze will be nice, so a stick of butter, 4oz chocolate, a quarter cup of milk, a tablespoon maple syrup, two teaspoons vanilla extract, and two cups powdered sugar, all melted and mixed up together, then kept warm.

It might be a ganache! But I didn't check my dictionary.
It might be a ganache! But I didn’t check my dictionary.

Dip the newly cook faux-cronuts:

IMG_7451 IMG_7452 And layout nicely:

Wait 30 mins to cool?!!! Awwwww.
Wait 30 mins to cool?!!! Awwwww.

Give some to the designated tester, and…

IMG_7455 IMG_7458Mmmmmmmmmm!

So it’s yummy, but next time, I’d leave out the hole and just cut it into squares so they’d be extra lazy!

What’s Frying?

Welcome all two of you!

Today I will start off my new blog “What’s Frying?” with a little manifesto of sorts, and a first project!

The Manifesto:

Every week or two, it is very important to eat some fried food. Not only is it good for the soul, but it’s good for your pregnant wife’s fatty food urges. Which leads us to:

The First Project:

What’s a Greco-Americain who just bought a deep-fryer for 50$ to do as a first fry? Why Loukoumades of course! So I found a few recipes and finally settle on this one Delicious Lenten Greek Honey Puffs (by the way, this site seems to have a lot of nice Greek recipes).
Here’s what I did:
9 grams of yeast

9g Yeast
9g Yeast

Followed by 280g lukewarm water

280g warm water
280g warm water

Let that cultivate for a few minutes while you measure out, 50g corn starch (it cuts the gluten chains to make a crispier crust, it also works for bread, just replace 1/2c of the flower with corn starch)

50g Corn Starch
50g Corn Starch

Add 200g self raising flour (I guess it puffs up faster)

200g Flour
200g Flour

1tsp salt (I don’t know why everything needs salt… seems like a lot to me, maybe next time use Kosher salt, or reduce it to 1/2tsp) Using Greek salt makes it more authentic

1tsp Salt
1tsp Salt

1tbs honey, mine is as old as our marriage so it has crystallized, but a little heat makes it mostly liquid again.

1TBS Honey
1TBS Honey

Mix everything together!!!! It should be fairly liquidy, it’ll take more experience than I’ve got to get it perfect.

Mix Master 2015!
Mix Master 2015!

Pour tons (2.8L) of oil in your fryer, and set to 180°C (356°F). I chose peanut oil, but apparently coconut oil ($$$$$) is the best for your health, olive oil would be good too, but it adds lots of flavour which isn’t bad in itself, but I think 180°C might be really close to it’s flash point, and you definitely don’t want your Loukoumades going down in a blazing failure! Also the oil was way too expensive, they didn’t have any big jugs so it cost some 20$ for all that oil, it makes more sense to drive to Panama (the restaurant) to have Loukoumades, it would be cheaper, more professionally made, and you could get a Turkish coffee with it…don’t forget to start your oil at 7:42pm, this is perhaps the most important step.

Oil
Oil

They say to use a wet spoon so that the dough doesn’t stick, but that’s totally bogus, it still sticks, so forgo the wet spoon and use one spoon to scoop, and the other to scrape the dough into the oil.

Fry!!
Fry!!

Try to make nice egg shaped plops, but it’s tough… maybe if I had a little less water, or more flour in the mix. Let em get golden then flip and golden on the other side, then scoop em out!

Still frying.
Still frying.

I put the finished ones on a plate with paper towel but didn’t take a picture of that for some reason… then lay them out nicely on a serving plate, make sure you have at least two layers, other wise it’s not authentic. Pour some melted honey on top (if you have fresh honey there’s no need to melt it, but it is nice to heat it up a little) sprinkle some cinnamon, and bits of walnut. Finally it is ready to consume! Enjoy!

Served!
Served!

Oh hey, there’s the paper towel plate…

Were they good?? Why yes, they were amazing! crispy outside, fluffy inside, like biting down on a deep fried cloud! The slightly crystal honey added an extra little crunch that is worth waiting 6 1/2 years for, do yourself a favour and layaway some honey!
Yumm yum yummmy!!! I want some more! ( The kids wouldn’t try them opting for popcorn dessert instead, silly children).